Monday, 3 January 2011

Those Left Behind

During these remarkable days when some sort of a realignment is taking place within Western Christianity, I would not wish to forget those who would call themselves Anglo-Catholics and who have, and will, remain in the Anglican Communion. These are bitter and difficult days. Those who are now becoming our new brothers and sisters have the consolation of their new home; those behind have to confront and live in a less congenial Anglican church and that without the support of those they relied on, especially their bishops whom they loved and trusted. They will understand why I support the Ordinariate wholeheartedly and welcome our new brothers, but that does not stop me worrying about and praying for those left behind.

I pray, of course, first that they too may find the grace, faith, whatever, to make the same crossing to the fulness of Catholic Communion. But anyway that God will aid them with his grace to do his will and find comfort there.

Feeling glad for our new brethren is not the same as gloating. Thanks be to God, I have seen very little (none, actually) of that.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

Relax; no need for worry; we'll be fine over here. We're home, too, you know.

Pastor in Valle said...

Anonynous; I'm happy for you, but not everyone thinks as you do.

Justin Wong said...

Fr Valle - How can you possibly be happy for Anon though? His gross error and misjudgment is nothing to be happy about surely?

Fr Michael Brown said...

Some Anglo-Catholics seem to think life will be easier without those entering the Ordinariate: http://revjph.blogspot.com/2011/01/and-then-nothing-much-happened.html

Little Black Sambo said...

Father, you are a good egg.

Pastor in Valle said...

Fr Michael:
Yes, there has always been the 'Affirming Catholic' group, unkindly (but not inaccurately, as your link indicates) summed up as 'girls at the altar, boys in bed'. Those aren't the ones I am writing about, but rather those who share most of the Catholic Church's doctrine, but not quite enough to be able to happily become Catholics.

Peter Collins said...

'Those aren't the ones I am writing about, but rather those who share most of the Catholic Church's doctrine, but not quite enough to be able to happily become Catholics.'

You cannot have a foot in both camps. You are either Anglican or you leave and become a Catholic. half and half just does not work for anyone.

Pastor in Valle said...

They, having their own definition of 'Catholic', think you can.

Auricularis said...

I have never understood the mentality of Anglo-Catholics, who will pray for the Holy Father in the canon of their masses, but cannot bring themselves to be united in full communion with him.

motuproprio said...

I have always held that you have to be either very clever or very foolish to be a throughgoing Anglo-papalist and remain in the Church of England for the whole of your ministry. Since I believe I am neither, I am no longer in the Church of England. The birth of the ordinariate makes a parish like St Silas Kentish Town even more eccentric, which is why it will remain obstinately Anglo-ppalist Church of England.

Anagnostis said...

During these remarkable days when some sort of a realignment is taking place within Western Christianity

Dear Father - with the best will in the world - you really can't be serious...

AndrewWS said...

Anagnostis: I think he is serious, but here he is going perhaps a little too far. The Ordinariates will, however, be renewal movements in the countries in which they are established.

Ben Whitworth said...

I just dropped into St Silas Pentonville, and was greeted by a picture of 'our bishop' on the noticeboard; he, of course, is at present a Roman Catholic layman. What very interesting times we live in.

My own view, for what its worth, is that the Ordinariate establishes a bridgehead. Some will cross the bridge sooner than others, but thirty years from now there will be no Anglo-Catholicism in the C of E. Feel free to contradict me in 2041 if I've got it wrong.

Robert said...

Some are staying for "the sake of the people." I don't agree but it is a worthy reason. Many are anglicans as it is a "good boat to fish from." It is reaaly evangelicals who actually say this but they have a point. The C of E priest is not seen as representating a denomination. you are the VICAR. In answer to this, i urge RC priests to be a pastor to all, not just the bgathered congragation. RC bishops should not fear stepping on the C of E's toes. There are vast numbers who do not know Christ:enough for all churches! However, I feel Pope Benedict appeals to many Anglo-Catholics. Not only does he understand their position and has been most generous but if i can be provocative with an ad hominem argument, perhaps we have an Anglo-Catholic pope! His Ressourcement theology looks to the fathers and to scripture and tradition. This was the guiding principle of the Oxford Movement. It is no wonder that Pope Benedict values Newman. Onreading De Lubac -who with Ratzinger and Balthazar founded the journal Communio- I feel I am somewhere familiar. The P{opoe sees Vatican II is the context of tradition rather than the liberal trajectories of the 1960s which sought the "spirit of VaticanII." Many Anglo-Catholics have also upheld this orthodoxy. The RC church should welcome this opportunity with open arms.

Yellow said...

Realignment? um.....50 priests are thinking of leaving a large proportion of them are retired....500 left after the ordination of women.

You do know there are thousands and thousands of priests in the church of England and most of them are evangelicals?