Monday, 4 July 2011

On Being a Blogger

There are a number of things that go with the territory of being a blogger. One is the fact that one will never rise in the ecclesiastical hierarchy. That to many is, of course, a relief, but it can be a bit disconcerting. A priest friend of mine had an excellent blog, which personal circumstances caused him to suspend. Having at the time been a curate, he was immediately made parish priest 'now that you've stopped writing your blog'. The blog, regrettably, hasn't re-started.

Another thing is being importuned by other blogs, sites and even advertisers, for free publicity on one's own blog. That makes me quite cross; a blog is one's personal thing, and being pressured to recommend something naturally inclines one the other way.

Or it does if you're me.

If someone asks me to recommend them, the first thing I do is to look at their site and see if they recommend my blog, or even mention it. Quid pro quo, after all. If I see nothing, I conclude that they are insincere, though I still feel guilty for ignoring the request. It doesn't imply that I don't agree with their aims, or think that their blog is poor. I just think that some good manners are as appropriate on the internet as in other parts of life.

10 comments:

pelerin said...

Don't the bishops realise how much we are all learning from the Catholic blogosphere? Or is that perhaps the problem?

Elizabeth from Sussex said...

That's the problem Pelerin.

georgem said...

I'm afraid that it happens in any field of work. Bosses don't like individual voices. They're seen as rocking the boat, even if on message.

The way upwards is to be seen to be playing by the rules. The boss's rules. I've known more than a few of demonstrable talent in my line of work who got nowhere.

Those who did rise, while hard-working, had nothing like the intellectual acumen of their colleagues who stayed put.

However, in terms of evangelisation, the Catholic blogosphere is gaining in importance and reach.

The depth of faith and the examination of it in blogs opens new avenues of thought and understanding not on the radar in my local parish (whose pp is tipped for certain advancement!).

Little Black Sambo said...

Blogging is inherently hostil to control-freakery.

Anonymous said...

One of the leading casualties of blogging censorship is the estimable and learned Fr Hunwicke. It appals many of us that a man of his distinction should have his ordination deferred because of his well-grounded posts. His potential for good in the Ordinariate is incalculable while, frankly, some pretty shady characters recently ordained within it have got through. I am hoping and praying that the way will soon be cleared for his ordination and that no conditions will be imposed against him blogging. Some of his posts deserve collection in books.

Convenor said...

Dear Father,

I hope you didn't mean us when you talked about others importuning you for free publicity!

www.catholicheritage.blogspot.com

God bless you!

Pastor in Valle said...

If the cap fits...

Victor S E Moubarak said...

Don't recommend my Blog Father ... it's terrible.

But you might like to visit the newly-formed Community of Catholic Bloggers - link on my Blog. Or perhaps be a guest contributor? If so, let me know.

God bless.

shane said...

Yes Father Hunwicke's loss to the blogosphere is a tragedy. I hope whoever deferred his ordination sees sense.

David Chiles said...

Being a good Blogger and being a good Catholic are not mutually exclusive. My sense of netiquette comes from my Catholic faith. Furthermore, Bill Gates, whose Internet Explorer web browser is the most widely used was educated in Catholic schools (Lakeside in Seattle WA). Balancing your vocation and your blog is good netiquette.