Thursday, 29 July 2010

Beyond parody

A retired Methodist minister is to conduct communion services by way of Twitter: he will tweet the prayers, and the 'congregation' will tweet back Amen.
If they have bread and wine (or grape juice, presumably, or Ribena for those who pride themselves on following the Bible literally), they can set them in front of their computer to be 'consecrated' by tweet.

Read about it here, and you can sign up if you like.

8 comments:

Doodler said...

Where in the Bible does it prescribe abstinence from Alcohol? However I share your problem with the tweet service!

Pastor in Valle said...

erm…… it's called irony, Doodler.

Joseph Shaw said...

Superb!

I was so shocked when I first heard of Baptists using Ribena in the chalice. But then as I learned more about their attitude to their Communion services, I realised it didn't make any difference.

Funny where these literalistic interpretations of Holy Scripture get you!

Torey said...

"He will tweet the prayers, and the 'congregation' will tweet back Amen." Very well said!

Antonio said...

Doesn't matter because it would still be invalid.

Richard Duncan said...

If you think that’s crazy, how about this?

I wonder if the dog received on the tongue or in the paw …

Joshua said...

Well, once we get down to the last few priests here in Australia (as some congregational types would rather wish to happen), they'll just have to stand by at the host factory and consecrate them en masse, so to speak, before vacuum packing them for distribution by post... that should keep happy the few who can be bothered going to lay-led communion services.

Anonymous said...

Some Protestants justify the use of non-fermented grape juice on Matt 26:29. At the conclusion of the institution narrative Jesus says, 'But I say unto you, I will not drink henceforth of this fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father's kingdom.' Does anybody know when this interpretation began?